Home » How To Edit An Audio File In Logic Pro X: Destructive and Non-Destructive

How To Edit An Audio File In Logic Pro X: Destructive and Non-Destructive

Logic Pro X offers two ways to edit an audio file: destructive audio editing and non-destructive. One permanently changes the audio file while the other preserves the original. What are destructive and non-destructive audio editing and how are they done in Logic Pro X?

Edit An Audio File In Logic Pro X

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How to edit audio in Logic Pro X

Logic Pro X gives you many tools and functions to edit an audio file.

You can perform your editing in the Tracks Area of the Main Window where you arrange the musical materials or in the Audio Track Editor.

Most of the editing done in Logic Pro X happens in Main Window or the Audio Track Editor.

The Main Window have all the editing tool you will find in the Audio Track Editor.

Since you will do most of the editing in the Main Window/Audio Track Editor, most of your edit will be non-destructive.

Destructive editing is done in the Audio File Editor.

Destructive editing

Edit An Audio File In Logic Pro X - Audio File Editor destructive editing
Logic Pro X Audio File Editor

Destructive editing permanently modifies the data in the original audio file.

In Logic Pro X, most edits and functions performed in the Audio File Editor are destructive.

When you save your Logic project, the audio files are saved in a dedicated Audio Files folder.

You can import each file in other Logic projects edit it without affecting the audio in the previous project – unless you use destructive editing.

If you make any edits in the Audio File Editor of one Logic projects, it will change the audio file in all the Logic projects the original audio is used in.

When making destructive edits, it is a good idea to copy the original audio before you start.

Logic Pro X does have an option the save or create a duplicate in the Audio File menu of the Editor.

After all that, you must be wondering if you should ever use destructive editing.

Logic Pro X Audio File Editor offers multiple functions such as Normalize, Change Gain, Fade In/Out, Reverse and Tim.

Most of which can be done in the Arrangement Window where you perform non-destructive editing (more on this later).

But edits such as removing pops and clicks, setting accurate crossover points for looped playback or correcting phase cancellation errors are best down in the Audio File Editor. These corrective edits are usually permanent.

Non-destructive editing

While destructive editing alters the original audio file, non-destructive lets you make edits without affecting the recorded source audio

Most edits that are done in the Main Window or the Audio Track Editor of Logic Pro X are non-destructive.

There are a lot more editing options available to you in the Main Window or the Audio Track Editor compare to the Audio File Editor.

You can move and trim audio regions, split and join them, quantize and edit the pitch of audio file without changing the original.

Non-destructive parameters such as quantize, transpose and gain are located in the Region Inspector.

Parameters in the Region Inspector edit the selected region.

Although Flex Time and Flex Pitch are non-destructive and won’t change the original audio file on your computer disk, they will alter the audio shared in other Logic projects.

To avoid issues between Logic projects that share the same audio files, I recommend making a duplicate already-used audio files before adding it to a new project.

Final Thought

No matter how you edit an audio file in Logic Pro X, remember that both non-destructive and destructive editing its purpose in audio production.

When you edit audio file in Logic Pro X it likely you are using non-destructive editing. It is the most ideal editing option but be afraid to also use destructive editing. But there are times when more permanent changes are desirable.

When you are cleaning up the audio file, it’s better to use destructive editing.